Electrocution is a serious risk for construction workers

Working with electricity can be dangerous, which is why those who are near or exposed to it frequently should always be using safety procedures to prevent an electric shock. A shock from a high voltage level can lead to serious burns, injuries and death, so taking precautions is necessary.

According to the Electrical Safety Foundation International, the time between 2003 and 2010 resulted in 42,882 occupational fatalities in the United States. Of those, the data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics states that 32 percent of all electrical fatalities occurred in only five occupations: Electricians, roofers, painters, carpenters and construction labor. Those in these occupations must be trained to handle electricity or, at the very least, what to do if they come into contact with potentially live wires.

In 2010, there were 163 fatalities caused by electrical hazards. The surprising fact is that each one of these deaths involved a man. Over half were repairing, cleaning or constructing something at the time of the electrocution. Between 2003 and 2010, the most common electrical cause of death was due to touching overhead power lines, while contact with transformers, wiring and other components led to fatal injuries as well.

If a loved one is electrocuted and passes away from the incident, his or her family has a right to seek workers' compensation benefits; some of those benefits include death benefits that should be paid to the family in certain circumstances. Those who have been injured should also have the ability to seek workers' compensation, which can cover medical costs and replace lost wages if they are unable to return to work.

Source: Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI), "Workplace Injury & Fatality Statistics," accessed Dec. 09, 2016

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